Pixel

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Monotype started to produce typefaces for its type casting machines back in the late 19th century. The production process required a set of 10-inch drawings to be created, establishing the design and dimensional characteristics of each letter in a typeface. Initially, designs were based on existing foundry typefaces in common use in the printing trade at the time, but within a few years new designs were developed, some based on historical types, some completely new designs such as the iconic Times New Roman and Gill Sans families.

Monotype’s office in Salfords, Surrey, is on the site that used to be its sprawling factory, which has made it possible for the company to hold onto the complete archive of its Type Drawing Office, even as the company’s manufacturing activities ceased.

The archive records about 80 years worth of typeface development (plus older material from other sources gathered over the years), containing drawings for all of Monotype’s hot metal typefaces, from the earliest — Modern series 1 (1900)— as well as associated correspondence, trial proofs, andstatistics. This material was essential to the process of transferring many typefaces to new formats as technologies changed, for instance to phototypesetting and then digital formats.

Today the archive is a storehouse of information about many of the world’s classic typefaces currently in common use, as well as being a source of inspiration for contemporary designers both within the company and elsewhere.

Robin Nicholas / Head of Typography / Monotype
Daniel Rhatigan / Type Director, UK / Monotype

Set In

Neue Haas Grotesk
by Christian Schwartz in 2011
Max Miedinger in 1957

SEA X MARCIN IGNAC 60,000 FONTS

Monotype started to produce typefaces for its type casting machines back in the late 19th century. The production process required a set of 10-inch drawings to be created, establishing the design and dimensional characteristics of each letter in a typeface. Initially, designs were based on existing foundry typefaces in common use in the printing trade at the time, but within a few years new designs were developed, some based on historical types, some completely new designs such as the iconic Times New Roman and Gill Sans families.

Monotype’s office in Salfords, Surrey, is on the site that used to be its sprawling factory, which has made it possible for the company to hold onto the complete archive of its Type Drawing Office, even as the company’s manufacturing activities ceased.

The archive records about 80 years worth of typeface development (plus older material from other sources gathered over the years), containing drawings for all of Monotype’s hot metal typefaces, from the earliest — Modern series 1 (1900)— as well as associated correspondence, trial proofs, and statistics. This material was essential to the process of transferring many typefaces to new formats as technologies changed, for instance to phototypesetting and then digital formats.

Today the archive is a storehouse of information about many of the world’s classic typefaces currently in common use, as well as being a source of inspiration for contemporary designers both within the company and elsewhere.

Robin Nicholas / Head of Typography / Monotype
Daniel Rhatigan / Type Director, UK / Monotype